Tag Archives: cor noltee, design thinking, design, art, education, curiosity, creativity

Building air and sand castles. Everything is connected. Part 26.

19 nov

This year I explored the Dutch Design Week. For me it’s the event of the year and this year I took the time to see and read ALL works at the Design Academy Eindhoven graduation show. It took me 3 days to read the book (460 pages) and see my selection of work and speak to the alumni. I’m sharing some of my favorite works on this blog connecting the works by Tate Modern’s ‘Ways of Looking’. Want to know more about Tate Modern’s ‘Ways of Looking’? Look here.

My last post was about ‘Afvalbank’, a bench you can kick litter in by Wouter Vastenouw.

What is it? The object.

A bench? A bin? A garbage game? A campaign about ‘litter on the street awareness’?

What is it about? The subject.

Encourage people to play? Cleaning the streets?

Today I will use the subject ‘Encourage people to play’ to make  a connection with the graduation work of Snir Gedasi:

“Children in war zones are forced to stay in an underground shelter. They lose their freedom, the ability to explore their surrounding and their childhood.

Safe Ground is an aboveground modular shelter (with an angle that provides more possibilities according to the needed size and the surrounding) – Integrated playground.

The time to run to a shelter is usually between 15 seconds and three minutes.
The proximity of the Safe Ground shelter shortens the time to run to a safe place.

Children can play outdoors and in case of a missile attack they are directly safe in the shelter.

Safe Ground is a Physical as well as mental protection that makes the experience of an attack and of the shelter a bit less cold and frightening.

The children as well as their parents can feel safer and more free.”

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And kids can even play in the dark:

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The opposite of play isn’t work but depression. I believe that if you take away the possibilities of children to play they will become depressed…..sooner or later.

Watch this great TED talk by Stuart Brown to learn more about the power of play:

I wonder how they get these concrete structures at their destination. What is they could make their own with this printer:

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It’s the Solar Sinter by Markus Kayser:

“In August 2010 I took my first solar machine – the Sun-Cutter – to the Egyptian desert in a suitcase. This was a solar-powered, semi-automated low-tech laser cutter, that used the power of the sun to drive it and directly harnessed its rays through a glass ball lens to ‘laser’ cut 2D components using a cam-guided system. The Sun-Cutter produced components in thin plywood with an aesthetic quality that was a curious hybrid of machine-made and “nature craft” due to the crudeness of its mechanism and cutting beam optics, alongside variations in solar intensity due to weather fluctuations.

In the deserts of the world two elements dominate – sun and sand. The former offers a vast energy source of huge potential, the latter an almost unlimited supply of silica in the form of quartz. The experience of working in the desert with the Sun-Cutter led me directly to the idea of a new machine that could bring together these two elements. Silicia sand when heated to melting point and allowed to cool solidifies as glass. This process of converting a powdery substance via a heating process into a solid form is known as sintering and has in recent years become a central process in design prototyping known as 3D printing or SLS (selective laser sintering). These 3D printers use laser technology to create very precise 3D objects from a variety of powdered plastics, resins and metals – the objects being the exact physical counterparts of the computer-drawn 3D designs inputted by the designer. By using the sun’s rays instead of a laser and sand instead of resins, I had the basis of an entirely new solar-powered machine and production process for making glass objects that taps into the abundant supplies of sun and sand to be found in the deserts of the world.

My first manually-operated solar-sintering machine was tested in February 2011 in the Moroccan desert with encouraging results that led to the development of the current larger and fully-automated computer driven version – the Solar-Sinter. The Solar-Sinter was completed in mid-May and later that month I took this experimental machine to the Sahara desert near Siwa, Egypt, for a two week testing period. The machine and the results of these first experiments presented here represent the initial significant steps towards what I envisage as a new solar-powered production tool of great potential.”

Playing with sand.

Building sand and air castles.

The power of dreams and play combined.

Back at where it all started; Kindergarten.

 

 

 

 

Jumping and Kicking. Everything is connected Part 25.

16 nov

This year I explored the Dutch Design Week. For me it’s the event of the year and this year I took the time to see and read ALL works at the Design Academy Eindhoven graduation show. It took me 3 days to read the book (460 pages) and see my selection of work and speak to the alumni. I’m sharing some of my favorite works on this blog connecting the works by Tate Modern’s ‘Ways of Looking’. Want to know more about Tate Modern’s ‘Ways of Looking’? Look here.

My last post was about Hoppa, a couch you can jump on by Renske Rothuizen.

I connect Rothuizen’s playful design by looking at the Subject – what is it about?

Rothuizen’s couch is about letting more play in your life. It’s about what people, in this case kids, do (and we grown ups sometime want to do but don’t) and that is PLAY. Seeing kids jumping on couches can also be a starting point for your design instead of a trigger to keep kids from jumping, read playing. I can hear parents telling their kids “yes you can watch television but you first have to jump 10 minutes on the couch.”

Play can change human behavior and make the world a better place. And cleaner if you  think like Wouter Vastenouw. He designed Afvalbank (Garbagebench):

“Stray litter is a persistant problem in urban areas. Drinks are consumed, and cans are then thrown in the street instead of a rubbish bin. Now, with ‘de Afvalbank’ Wouter Vastenouw makes cleaning up cool. From the outside it looks like just a regular bench. But, kick a can towards the slot in the base and it disappears inside. Kick it at the right angle and a chime inside rings a congratulatory sound, inviting more action. The fun factor is instant as the cans become footballs, with the bench as a goal. Who can resist?”

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Who can resist? I could not. At the graduation show I just had to kick some cans in the bench to hear the chime. I was the only one. I’m sure it works better in a public place.

Using play to clean the world. You know the world’s deepest bin?

‘Cleaning up for kicks’ it says on Wouter Vastenouw’s page.

Jumping and kicking can make the world a better place.

 

Everything is connected Part 24

15 nov

This year I explored the Dutch Design Week. For me it’s the event of the year and this year I took the time to see and read ALL works at the Design Academy Eindhoven graduation show. It took me 3 days to read the book (460 pages) and see my selection of work and speak to the alumni. I’m sharing some of my favorite works on this blog connecting the works by Tate Modern’s ‘Ways of Looking’. Want to know more about Tate Modern’s ‘Ways of Looking’? Look here.

My last post was about a game by Cox Janssens about having kids….or not.

I connect Janssens game by looking at the Subject – what is it about?

It’s about kids and becoming a parent.

Kids and parents.

Renske Rothuizen made ‘Hoppa’:

“No jumping on the couch!” It’s a common phrase in many a household with kids. But how many of us don’t secretly long for those days of careless fun, when everyday furniture became a trampoline under our feet? To welcome some bounce back into our lives she created ‘Hoppa’. At first glance, it looks like a regular ‘grown- up’ couch. The distinct springy sensation upon sitting down reveals a frame snugly encased in woven elastic. Leaps and bounds are not only permitted; they are actively encouraged.

hoppa

Hoppa received the Connect(r)ing Award from the Design Academy Eindhoven for reducing the generation gap.

I think if danser Nanine Linning will ever have kids Hoppa will be an option for in her living room. Danser,  choreographer and entrepreneur starts her days by jumping on her small trampoline on her balcony.

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Watch the great (dutch) documentary about Nanine Linning here.

 

Everything is connected Part 23

13 nov

This year I explored the Dutch Design Week. For me it’s the event of the year and this year I took the time to see and read ALL works at the Design Academy Eindhoven graduation show. It took me 3 days to read the book (460 pages) and see my selection of work and speak to the alumni. I’m sharing some of my favorite works on this blog connecting the works by Tate Modern’s ‘Ways of Looking’.

Yesterday I ended up ‘playing’ moneyless Monopoly, the graduation work by Hannah van Luttervelt. With ‘No Money Sector’ she “tries to define an alternative economic system that does not revolve around earning money.”

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It’s maybe hard to imagine Monopoly without money. Then try this one, a life without kids. Last week a friend, who just became father for the fourth time, told me that he never expected to become a parent. “That’s how life goes” he said.

Isn’t it strange that for the most important job in the world you don’t need any experience or ‘diploma’. At school you learn How to make kids but shouldn’t we start with Why?

Cox Janssens thinks “when it comes to children people have a choice. But because the prevailing societal norm is still to aspire to parenthood, the choice is not as free as it appears. Social pressure is considerable. After researching the subject she decided to balance the debate and offer a more positive view on life without offspring. She created ‘Apart from the Norm’, a set of conversation cards that can be used by those still in doubt or those struggling with involuntary childlessness. The cards’ visual cues help them distinguish their own desires from those projected by outsiders.”graduation2-cox-janssens-buiten-gewoon-de-normgraduation2-cox-janssens-buiten-gewoon-de-norm2

Kids or no kids. Make up your mind. And hurry. Life is short. Play More……about kids.

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Everything is connected Part 22

12 nov

This year I explored the Dutch Design Week. For me it’s the event of the year and this year I took the time to see and read ALL works at the Design Academy Eindhoven graduation show. It took me 3 days to read the book (460 pages) and see my selection of work and speak to the alumni. I shared some of my favorite works.

Like yesterday  with the untraceable money of Magnús Ingvar Ágústsson.

I wondered if  Magnús and Jaap Drupsteen were connected and had send them a email with a link to yesterdays post to find out. Still no trace of a reaction.

Magnús Ingvar Ágústsson’s work is about money and so is the work of Hannah van Luttervelt. Or is not.

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With ‘No Money Sector’ she “tries to define an alternative economic system that does not revolve around earning money. After researching various options, she developed a future scenario based on the concept of an unconditional basic income. In the ‘No Money Sector’ information and skills will be shared openly. Want to know how fulfilling that can be? Play the game and find out if you’re a creator, translator or facilitator. This moneyless Monopoly will give you a new perspective on the major challenges in society.”

You can find her research here.

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Moneyless. John Baldessari carries absolutely nothing in his pocket and Stefan Sagmeister printed ‘Money does not make me happy’ on a casino.

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What makes me happy? Sharing this.

For free.

Have a nice Saturday.

 

 

Everything is connected Part 21

10 nov

This year I explored the Dutch Design Week. For me it’s the event of the year and this year I took the time to see and read ALL works at the Design Academy Eindhoven graduation show. It took me 3 days to read the book (460 pages) and see my selection of work and speak to the alumni. I shared some of my favorite works.

I wrote about Stefan Bukkems’ ‘Senza’. A visual aid to help decipher human emotions.

And about Laura van de Kruijs’  ‘And I FEEL!’. Wooden message boards with compliment labels, love signs, an honesty stick and a mood meter allowing parents and kids to communicate without words.

It reminded me of one of my favorite internet based art works. I stumbled upon it in 2006 and it is called We Feel Fine by Jonathan Harris and Sepandar Kamvar. They call We Feel Fine “an exploration of human emotion on a global scale.”

But We Feel Fine is also an example of how technology is able to give meaning to data people share online. It shows clearly that everything can easily be connected without the connected ones being aware of it. Sharing online means being traceable.Big Brother is watching you.

Imagine what you would have to do to become untraceable.

Design Academy graduate Magnús Ingvar Ágústsson designed Vessel:

“Every digital transaction is traceable. That means that the shift to a cashless society would mean a total loss of privacy. The value of that privacy is underestimated. Being under constant surveillance leads to self-censorship, affecting your actions. Even digital solutions like Bitcoin can still potentially be monitored. Using cash remains the easiest way to ensure anonymity. ‘Vessel’ is a new form of physical payment for a future when cash as we know it is obsolete. Each Vessel bears a unique public ‘address’. Users can check the address online to make sure the given value is valid. The money then changes hands without further tracking.”

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I wonder if Ágústsson knows the work of Jaap Drupsteen.

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And I wonder if Jaap and Magnús are connected.

I will send them a mail with a link to this post to find out.

 

Everything is connected Part 19

3 nov

Last week I went to Eindhoven to explore the Dutch Design Week. The last 12 years I saw the graduation show of the Design Academy Eindhoven grow into an internationally appreciated design and inspirational event. For me it’s the event of the year and this year I took the time to see and read ALL works at the DAE graduation show. It took me 3 days to read the book (460 pages) and see my selection of work and speak to the alumni. The coming days I will share some of my favorite works.

My last post was about the visualization of feelings. The last sentence was ‘How do you feel?’

And what if you don’t use words to answer this question.

DAE ‘Man and Leisure’ Graduate Laura van de Kruijs made ‘And I FEEL!’

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In the graduation book I read this:

‘During her stay in a Thai mindfulness community Laura van de Kruijs noticed that many people are still trying to cope deal with issues from their childhood. She researched how to with emotional stress at an early age. In close collaboration with psychologists, she monitored several families, living with them like ‘The Nanny’ and trying out interventions. The problem often lay in the inability of family members to express their feelings towards each other. And l FEEL’ is a toolkit that playfully breaks down barriers. These wooden message boards with compliment labels, love signs, an honesty stick and a mood meter allow parents and kids to communicate without words.’

Communicating about how you feel without words. Where would this bring me tomorrow?

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Everything is connected Part 17

30 okt

Last week I went to Eindhoven to explore the Dutch Design Week. The last 12 years I saw the graduation show of the Design Academy Eindhoven grow into an internationally appreciated design and inspirational event. For me it’s the event of the year and this year I took the time to see and read ALL works at the DAE graduation show. It took me 3 days to read the book (460 pages) and see my selection of work and speak to the alumni. The coming days I will share some of my favorite works.

The last work I shared on this blog  was Notion Motion of Danish-Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson (1967, Copenhagen). Over the past fifteen years Eliasson has built up an impressive body of work consisting of rainbows, sunsets, waterfalls, aromatic walls, mist, beams of light and periscopes. At the exhibition this notion of motion was realized by Eliasson’s fascination for motion and the elements, in this case water.

From Notion, Motion and Water to Emotion and Frozen Water with Yi-Fei Chen’s ‘Tear Gun’;

“Her upbringing in Taiwan has instilled a deep respect for authority. Disagreeing with your teachers is considered rude, and must be suppressed. Coming to the Netherlands for a Master’s degree was a shock to her system. Within Western higher education, students are taught to question authority and expected to take a critical attitude. For many students like Chen it can be a confusing and emotional journey to adapt to such a new set of circumstances. The pressure they feel to step outside their own comfort zone may even cause drastic responses. Chen has visualised her personal struggle to toughen up and speak her mind with a striking metaphor: she has frozen the tears she shed during an incident where she had to speak up but couldn’t, and built a gun to fire them. Next time a teacher puts her on the spot, she will be ready to respond with equal force.”

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Mental authority leading to fierce inner conflict because of cultural difference and tears which are collected, frozen and shot. All resulting in physical authority.

At her graduation Chen pointed her tear gun at department head Jan Boelen. The process took time to prepare, to load, to pump. Boelen became visibly uncomfortable with having a gun pointed at him.

Chen maintained her rhythm.

And fired.

The tear hit him and melted.

 

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